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the question and answer a quick >> to question his intelligence in the pit and the cia and will it be more state-based rather than looking at nonstate actors and that sort of thing. i have heard that much about it. in general we are state-based now. the question is every state-based enough? anymore in this -- an enormous amount of territory to cover. you've got north korea. you've got the strategic waterways such as the malacca strait. you've got the south and east china seas and then you getting territory towards qualm, our territory. in recent years there's been expansion in the indian ocean. we at diego and that's really about it. we aren't using a lot of the means that we need out there such as autonomous vehicles to do high-level surveillance. mid-level surveillance without a fire scouts and other things out there in the numbers we need. but we haven't done is pushed our allies and that's one of the things we should do is pushed. come to south korea and others to begin sharing amongst themselves. there is a bank whether or not it's true, but it certainly seems to be at least a valuabl
at the california state university monterey bay. as you know, he served as cia director before he came secretary of defense in 2011. so for all those reasons, it is now my honor to introduce to you secretary leon panetta, and to welcome him to georgetown. [applause] >> thank you very much, bob. i really appreciate that very kind introduction. and i want to thank you for the invitation to be here, and to hopefully give you one of my last speeches as secretary of defense. and have a chance to be able to share some thoughts with all of you. you, about the challenges that we are confronting today, challenges related to security but more important, the challenges related to leadersh leadership. it's appropriate that i do this at georgetown. as a product of jesuit education, as a catholic, and as a beneficiary over the years of your outstanding faculty and staff, and your important policy contributions that this university has made in a number of areas. that affect the people of this country. i'm truly honored to have this opportunity today. i've had a deep and abiding respect for georgetown throughou
effective leader at the pentagon. john brennan is somebody i worked with the at the director of cia and continued to work with in this capacity. i found him to be responsible about how we can effectively conduct operations again al qaeda and against those that would attack this country. he is -- as somebody said, a straight shooter. somebody who, you know, gives you his best opinion, he doesn't play games. he is somebody who i think, you know, can honestly represent the best protection in this country in that job. >> thank you very much. i want to thank you for your forthright comments today about the sequester. ironically, as i take some notes what you said and in the statement. it appears as of today the greatest threat to american national security is the united states congress. thank you, mr. secretary. thank you, senator. senator nelson. after senator nelson, the first round will be over. there may be a number of us that want a few minutes on the second round. you have been here for about three hours and you may need a fife or ten minute break. do you want that immediately foll
the recommendation by secretary of state clinton and head of cia general betrayers to provide weapons to the resistance in syria? >> we did. >> you supported that. >> we did. >> they give for appearing here today i also want to add my voice to thank you for your long service and we wish you well as you return to your wall the farm and your grandchildren and california i would like to look more broadly at the challenges that we face in africa. wanted knowledge september 11, 2012, you were fighting a war in afghanistan, a counterterrorism issues, the training troops, patrolling skies and providing humanitarian relief. despite that you have clearly taken the deaths of the four state department employees and benghazi to heart. making sure that does not happen again. >> i know you share that point* of view. >> i know we conducted training with african military's, talk about those relationships or ties and specifically shinri expand training missions for other duties state department programs in africom. >> the short answer is yes. >> the threat network is desperate organizations that to em
force and the cia, and he was sent to the philippines in the late 1940s when they were facing rebellion, one of the major communist uprisings of the postworld war ii period. and what he did was he didn't send an army to back them up, he simply drove out into the boob docks to -- boondocks to get to know the people in the embassy. he went out there to figure out what was really going on, and the most important thing that he did was he identified a great leader who could lead the philippines out of this morass are some support. and that was ramon -- [inaudible] who was a, just a filipino senator when he encountered him. lansdale pushed to make him the first defense minister and then the president. and he was this great leader who rooted out a lot of the corruption which was causing people to turn away from the philippine government. he ended the brutality on the part of the filipino army which was causing villagers to flee into the hands of the hucks. he established clean elections, and he basically took away all of the ideological appeal that the hucks could possibly have. this was an in
would gut the cia and the intelligence platform. it is just not about tanks and planes, the smallest air force in the history of the country. the smallest army since 1940. it is about the cia. it is about the intelligence gathering capabilities of the country. it is also about the department of education. it is about nondefense matters. so i am hopeful that we can finally start voting in the senate rather than just complaining about what the house does. we bear responsibility as republicans for allowing this to happen. lead us to a better solution. if you do not, mr. president, you will go down in history as one of the most irresponsible commanders in chief in the history of the country. you allow the finest military in the history of the world to deteriorate at a time when we need it the most. let's not let that happen. >> let me just add or emphasize three quick points. the first is reducing civilians by attrition is a good idea, even at dod. i would just remind you that yesterday the recently departed undersecretary for policy, argued in "the washington post" that we needed to reduce
. that will be live at 10 a.m. eastern on c-span3. the presidency choice to head up the cia is at a confirmation hearing. john brennan will answer questions from the senate intelligence community begin at 2:30 p.m. eastern on c-span. the u.s. senate is about to gavel in the session in about five minutes or so. we will have live coverage here on c-span2. while we wait, remarks or white house adviser john brennan who was at the wilson center in april of last year, when he called drone strikes legal, ethical and wise and the highest characters and standards to limit the loss of civilian life. >> i stand as someone who has been involved our nation's agree for more than 30 years. i have a profound appreciation for the tour remarkable capabilities of architectures and professionals. and our relationships with other nations. we must never compromise that. i will not discuss the sensitive details of any specific operation today. i will not nor will it ever publicly divulge sensitive intelligence sources of methods. for when that happens, our national security is endangered analyze can be lost. at the sa
] [inaudible conversations] >> the senate intelligence committee will hold a confirmationing hearing for cia director nominee john brennan this afternoon. live coverage is on c-span at 2:30 eastern. members of the senate intelligence committee are expected to is ask about drone strikes and terror suspects. at the wilson center last april, mr. brennan said drone strikes are legal, ethical and wise. >> i stand here as someone who has been involved with our nation's security for more than 30 years. i have a profound appreciation for the truly remarkable capabilities of our counterterrorism professionals and our relationships with other nations. and we must never compromise them. i will not discuss the sensitive details of any specific operation today. i will not, nor will i ever, publicly divulge sensitive intelligence sources is and methods, for when that happens, our national security is endangered, and lives can be lost. at the same time, we reject the notion that any discussion of these matters is a step onto a slippery slope that inevitably endangers our national security. too often that f
to become the next cia director. on c-span2, outgoing defense secretary leon panetta, and chair of the joint chiefs of staff general martin dempsey testified on the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. and on c-span3 tonight education secretary arne duncan discusses the no child left behind law, and the obama administration's waiver process. all these events are tonight beginning at 8 p.m. eastern on the c-span networks. >> having observed a steady improvement and the opportunities and well being of our citizens, i can report to you, the state of this old but useful union is good. >> once again, in keeping with time-honored tradition i've come to report to you on the state of the union. and i'm pleased to report that america is much improved, and there's good reason to believe that improvement will continue for the data,. >> my duty tonight is to report on the state of the union, not the state of our government, but of our american community. and to set forth our responsibilities in the words of our founders, perform -- to form a more perfect union. the state of the union is strong. >>
called watching "zero dark thirty" with the cia. separating fact from fiction. that's not part of this series but it is another national security event that i think will be both interesting and fun tomorrow. so with that let me thank all of you, and you, and we are closed. [applause] [inaudible conversations] >> several livens to tell you about today. the georgetown university law center hosts a form with campaign staff members and representatives of interest groups who will focus on how lessons from last year's campaign will affect legislation in the new congress. >> from almost the funnier able to see fertility rates declining, and by the time we hit the second world war we were right around replacement rate. right around 2.1, 2.2. then after the first world war, or the second world war we had the only major increase in our fertility rates. that's the baby boom. that's the term which gets us. it really was a remarkable moment. it not only was the fertility rate increase quite i can put up to as high as 3.7 i think white americans and i think 3.9 for black americans, not only
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10